From the WBWC Blog:

New Arrivals

New Arrivals

Harriet Willa Brandom – 7 lbs., 11 oz. – April 1 Savannah Emily Royal – 7 lbs., 11 oz. – April 2 Harrison James Tester – 7 lbs., 8 oz. – April 2 *Jamison River Osterhoudt – 8 lbs., 14 oz. – April 3 Alice Harriet Bertone – 8 lbs., 1 oz. – April 4 Tessa Lynn Faron – 8 lbs., 1 oz. – April 6 Jackson Bechtler Realon – 8 lbs., 2 oz. – April 9 Jonah James Pfrommer – 7 lbs., 7 oz. – April 10 Willow Grace Ash – 7 lbs., 8 oz. – April 11 Vincent James Porter – 8 lbs., 6 oz. – April 12 Abigail Grace Skinner – 8 lbs., 1 oz. – April 15 Luke Thomas Price – 5 lbs., 11 oz. – April 15 Eve Delia Lyall – 8 lbs., 4 oz. – April 16 Harrison Alexander Smirnov – 8 lbs., 8 oz. – April 16 Eliza Wynn Dennis – 7 lbs., 6 oz. – April 16 Rosemary Fern Shumaker – 8 lbs., 8 oz. – April 17 Joselyn Reese Kelly – 9 lbs., 3 oz. – April 19 Elijah Mack Kerr – 9 lbs., 8 oz. – April 19 Baby Girl Hefetz – 7 lbs., 6 oz. – April 20 Penelope Jantje Cottrell – 10 lbs., 3 oz. – April 20 Nicholas Matthew Brooks – 8 lbs., 12 oz. – April 22 Nehemiah Makhi Williamson – 6 lbs., 10 oz. – April 23 Sophie Grace Johnson – 5 lbs., 7 oz. – April 23 Ethan David Whitenack – 6 lbs., 1 oz. – April 25 Jonah Badi Sabet – 8 lbs., 9 oz. – April 25 Jones Weston Phillips – 10 lbs., 15 oz. – April 26 Denning Wells Edwards – 7 lbs., 14 oz. – April 27 Hugh Edgar Murtens – 9 lbs. – April 30 Willow Alexis Robbins – 7 lbs., 13 oz. – April 30 If you’d like your baby’s birth announced in the newsletter, send an email to missy_swanson@hotmail.com. Be sure to include baby’s name, weight, and birth date, and feel free to attach a picture. We’d like to hear from all WBWC moms, whether you delivered at the birth center or UNC!    

The Birth of Samuel David Cudd

The Birth of Samuel David Cudd

by Kimberly Cudd      I woke up at 4 am, 11/5/12, knowing I was in labor, but not wanting to believe it just yet. After a false alarm at 38 weeks that resulted in 8 hours of contractions but no baby, I wanted to be certain before I made any calls. After an hour of increasingly strong contractions, I woke up my husband and told him to get ready. The contractions were about 5-7 minutes apart already and about 30-45 seconds each. At 6 am, we called my mother to come watch our 4-year-old, and then we called the Birth Center. They advised me to wait an hour and call back. I knew it was only a formality and that my baby would be born that day, so I breathed through a few more contractions and at 7 am, we called back, happy to report stronger contractions. We live an hour from the Birth Center, so they advised us to come on in.     One of my very best friends had agreed to be my doula, so she was the next call we made. I knew she’d set me straight when I looked at her and said “I can’t do this.” She also happens to be a great photographer, and I knew she’d capture the moments of my labor and delivery through the lens of her camera! At about 7:30am, we were on the road. I was nervous about handling contractions in the car, but the changing scenery offered a welcome distraction. I had approximately 15 contractions during the hour ride.      Sarah and Emily were both working that morning, and I remember feeling so relieved as I saw their faces because I knew they could handle whatever was about to happen and felt confident in their ability to guide me into my ‘dream birth.’ It was 8:30 am when we arrived, and Emily was happy to announce that I was 5 cm dilated. She was very reassuring and enthusiastic about how well I was doing, which was incredibly encouraging and gave me the extra confidence I needed. She suggested trying the shower to see if that helped. I sat on the birthing ball as my loving husband aimed the shower head at my belly. It was awful. The contractions were intense and close together, and I remember gripping the handrails and holding on for dear life just … Read More

News from the Board

News from the Board

by Kaaren Haldeman The board met in April and May to continue our work in strengthening the future of WBWC. As the next phase begins, we would like to thank Jane Brown and Yesenia Polanco Galdamez for their service to the board over the last year. Both Jane and Yesenia have resigned from board work, and we wish them both the best in their respective personal and professional lives. Additionally, Annie Lyerly will be stepping down as a board member but will continue to serve as a special advisor to the board and WBWC. We thank all of our members, past and present, for working passionately and diligently to ensure a strong future for our organization and our important work in serving women and their families in birth and beyond.

Hearty Meat-Free Soup

Hearty Meat-Free Soup

 By Brianna Honea  Black beans and sweet potatoes are healthy and low in cost — great for families on a tight budget. Legumes and beans are low in fat, contain no cholesterol and are high in folate, potassium, iron and magnesium. They also contain beneficial fats and soluble and insoluble fiber. A good source of protein, legumes are a healthy substitute for meat, which has more fat and cholesterol. It can be challenging to serve healthy meals on a budget, but with planning you can eat better for less. You can save money by adding meatless meals to your weekly menus. Meatless meals are built around vegetables, beans and grains — instead of meat, which is more expensive. Meatless meals also offer health benefits. A plant-based diet emphasizes vegetables and fruits, grains, beans and legumes, and nuts, is rich in fiber, vitamins and other nutrients. People who eat only plant-based foods — aka vegetarians — generally eat fewer calories and less fat, weigh less and have a lower risk of heart disease than meat-eaters. I have adopted a plant-based diet (I am vegan) and feel healthier than ever.  I think a plant-based diet has helped me to have more energy, clarity and a great immune system.   I encourage everyone to consider the advantages of plant-based diet for their family.    I love this hearty soup — this recipe brings a lot of flavor. Black Bean & Sweet Potato Soup Recipe adapted from Plant-Powered 15 written by Dreena Burton Serves 4-5 Ingredients 1-2 tablespoon(s) water 1½ – 1¾ cups chopped onions (one large onion) 1½ cups combination of chopped red peppers and green peppers 1¼ teaspoon sea salt freshly ground black pepper to taste (generous is good) 2 teaspoons cumin seeds (if substituting cumin powder, use a little less; fennel seeds can also be a substitute) 2 teaspoons dried oregano leaves ¼ teaspoon allspice (rounded) ¼ teaspoon (or less/more, to taste) red pepper flakes 4 medium-large cloves garlic, minced or grated 4½ – 5 cups black beans (reserve 1 cup; this is three 14-15 oz cans) 3 cups water 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice ½ – 1 teaspoon pure maple syrup 1 bay leaf 1½ cups cubed (in small chunks, about ½”) yellow sweet potato Optional: Chopped cilantro, lime wedges or chopped avocado with a dash of lime and salt  for serving   Instructions: In a … Read More

What All New Parents Need (and What They Don’t Need!)

What All New Parents Need (and What They Don’t Need!)

by Holly Lindsay-Miller When I first got pregnant, I was on my way to becoming ever more conscientious in the way I lived. Truth be told, we were getting ready to go down to one income, and our home was not going to be spatially accommodating. We had to be thoughtful, and let’s face it, that’s hard to do in our modern, materialistic, consumerist world! We are told we need so many things as parents, and that has the subconscious effect of making us think that what we already have, who we are, isn’t good enough. We’re told we need THINGS to make us good parents. Just walk into a Babies R Us or Buy Buy Baby! We might need 5-7% of what is sold in these retail superstores. Well,  first-time parents, we may not know that. We’ve never done it before. Yes, we know we have to follow the safety laws and get a car seat, and yes, we know our sweet babies need clothes and diapers. Everyone we know wants to buy toys galore, but what are those things we truly need and what are those things we absolutely do not? As they say in La Leche League meetings, treat this information as a buffet. Take what you want; leave what you don’t. We’re all in this together, after all! Top 10 Must-Haves: 1.  Breastfeeding support – We’ve all read or been told babies were born to breastfeed and that’s basically true, but often the beginning is tough. We now have nursing pillows, nipple creams, nursing bras and tanks, absorbent nursing pads, hydro-gel pads, nursing books, IBCLC’s, and what I deem most important, OTHER NURSING WOMEN! In our culture, we rarely grow up watching our mothers, aunts, sisters, cousins, friends and neighbors nursing. We don’t necessarily know what normal looks like and how it feels. 2.    A baby resource book – When our children get ill it’s unsettling, particularly in the first weeks of a baby’s. Children tend to have issues at night or weekends when we feel alone already. A good baby reference book, such as Dr. Sears’s The Portable Pediatrician, is such a nice go-to when you don’t know if what your wee-one is doing is normal, requires an after-hours nurse call, or a helicopter lift to your local emergency room. (Things feel so much bigger when the sun is down!) 3.    A good baby carrier – Babies … Read More